BOM With Parameters (Matrix BOM)

With the MRPeasy Professional edition, it is possible to manage products with parameters and many variations.

The BOM With Parameters functionality allows both changing the materials and their quantities in a bill of materials based on parameter values selection. This allows defining complex parametrical and configurable products, automatically selecting the specific bills of materials and tracking each variation separately in stock.

  • How to use parameters, which change quantities of materials in a BOM?
  • How to use parameters and relations for selecting material items in a BOM?
  • How to combine several parameters selection for selecting materials in a BOM?
  • How to build a multi-level Matrix BOM, where sub-assemblies are also parametrical?

User Manual: BOM with Parameters / Matrix BOM

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Transcript:

With the MRPeasy Professional edition, it is possible to manage products with parameters and many variations.

The BOM with parameters functionality allows both changing the materials and their quantities in a bill of materials based on parameter values selection. This allows defining complex parametrical and configurable products, automatically selecting the specific bills of materials and tracking each variation separately in stock.

Example 1. Single-level Matrix BOM using parameters and relations.

In the first example, we will be configuring a dress that has several sizes, colors and fabrics, with a total of 27 possible different variations.

The exact same approach can be used for very different products, like electronics, industrial equipment and machinery or other kinds of configurable products.

I. Using parameters that change the quantities of raw materials.

First, let’s just use one parameter – size – and see how to set up a bill of materials when the parameter values alter the material quantities.

We’ve already predefined the dress item and a routing for it, which will be common for all variations. We are yet to configure parameters and the bill of materials.

As the next step, we will be defining the parameter in the “stock settings” section.

Each parameter has a name and a list of possible values. The quantities of raw materials used will depend on the size parameter’s chosen value; therefore, we will select the appropriate checkbox.

Let’s enter our three sizes: small, medium and large, and their codes, which will be used for item number generation.

This parameter is set up; now, let’s see how to build a matrix BOM with just one parameter.

First, let’s add the parameter “size” to our item.

Then, let’s select all possible variations by selecting which combinations of parameter values are allowed.

Finally, let’s add the BOM. We see that there is one materials quantity column corresponding to each value of the “size” parameter. Therefore, we must define the quantity of materials consumed for each of our sizes.

When we try to create a manufacturing order, we see that corresponding to the size we choose, the software correctly calculates the materials requirements.

II. Using relations for changing materials

Now, let’s add the color parameter, for selecting the correct color of material that will be consumed.

Again, we have a base item predefined only with a routing, and as a next step, we must additionally define the color parameter in the “stock settings” section.

This parameter does not change the quantities of raw materials, so we will leave this option unchecked.

Let’s enter the three possible values, their codes and “save.”

As the next step, we must tell the software how the color parameter is connected to specific materials. For this, me must create a relation in the “relations” section.

Here, we will select the parameter “color,” its values, and for each value, we’ll match a stock item – in this case a different colored material.

As the next step, we will open our product’s details, and then assign it the two parameters. Then, select the allowed variations, and start creating the bill of materials.

Again, as in the previous case, we see that we have one quantity column for each size.

However, this time, instead of choosing a specific material from the relations drop-down menu, we will select the relation that connects the color choice to the specific material.

When a specific value for the color parameter is selected, the correct fabric will populate the bill of materials. We see this when we create a Manufacturing Order.

III. Combining several parameters for changing the material

To make things more complicated, let’s add the last parameter – the fabric – which when combined with the color, determines the correct fabric to choose.

As previous times, we have our base product predefined, without parameters and a BOM; so, we can move directly to creating the new parameter.

When done, we must move forward to configuring the relation. This time, the relation combines two parameters with one stock item.

For each line, let’s choose the combination of the two parameters and the appropriate stock item for the colored fabric, which matches the selected values.

As we have 3 different colors and 3 different fabrics, this makes up 9 different combinations.

Once done, let’s go to the product’s details and add the parameters. Then choose the allowed combinations.

Now, let’s continue to the bill of materials.

Again, we see that we have one quantity column for each size.

This time, again, instead of choosing a specific material, we will select the relation from the relations drop-down menu, which connects the color and fabric choice to the specific material.

When specific values for the color and fabric parameters are selected, the correct fabric will populate the bill of materials. We see this when we create a Manufacturing Order.

Example 2. Multi-level Matrix BOM

In some cases, you could have sub-assemblies, which are also parametrical, and the specific build depends on the chosen parameter values of the end-product.

There are two options for setting this up. One option is to use “relations” and select which sub-assembly variations correspond to specific parameter values. This approach is identical to our previous example, so we will not be repeating it.

The second option is to pass the chosen parameter values from the end-product to the sub-assembly via the bill of materials. This is possible when the sub-assembly and end-product share the same parameter.

Again, an easily understandable example comes from the textile industry, where each clothing item can be made up of several pieces, which are often cut in bulk and stocked, and are managed as half-products or sub-assemblies.

If the product has three parameters – size, color and fabric – then the pieces, which are sub-assemblies, will have all or some of these parameters as well: a small blue cotton dress will have small blue cotton pieces, and so on.

To show how this works, we’ll construct a multi-level bill of materials for a dress, where the dress is made of two pieces, which both have parametrical bills of materials.

We’ve predefined two pieces, which will be the sub-assemblies for the final product. The pieces are defined identically to the earlier example, where the size parameter changes the quantity of the material consumption, and the combination of the color and fabric parameters defines the material to use via a relation.

Now, let’s open the dress item. We have already predefined the routing. Now, let’s add the three parameters to the item and choose the allowed combinations.

Next, let’s create the bill of materials.

As materials, we will choose the two pieces with parametrical BOMs. We will not be choosing the specific parameter values, which means that the chosen parameter values for the dress item will be passed down to the sub-assemblies, and the same values will be used.

For each size, we will consume one piece of each. We can quickly fill the whole line with keyboard shortcut “alt + p.”

Now, when we create a manufacturing order, the software will automatically choose the correct pieces, materials and quantities, based on the selected parameters values.

We’ve only defined three items, but since both of the pieces have 27 variations, and the end product has 27 variations, then in total we have 81 different bills of materials, and we can track each of these variations separately in stock.

Enabling the functionality

The BOM with parameters functionality can be enabled in the section “settings – system settings – professional functions.”

It is possible to choose if variations must be predefined, or if all variations are permitted and will be automatically created when a new combination of parameter values is chosen.

Also, you can choose if variations have different part numbers, and what is the separator used when generating part numbers for the variations.

In this video, we described how the BOM with parameters functionality works.

To learn more about MRPeasy, please see our other videos.

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